NFB partners with New York Times’ Op-Docs

The organizations will collaborate on A Short History of the Highrise, a project of four short docs, as part of the NFB's ongoing Highrise project.
NFBNYTHighrise-1

The National Film Board of Canada is collaborating with The New York Times Opinion Pages on a new multiplatform Op-Docs series as part of the NFB’s ongoing Highrise project.

A Short History of the Highrise, an interactive project of four short documentaries, “explores the history and future of high-rise buildings and their relationship to issues of equity, segregation and social responsibility in cities around the world,” the NFB said in a release.

Highrise director Katerina Cizek is directing the short documentaries, which are produced by the NFB in collaboration with The Times.

The first three parts of Highrise will use The Times‘ photography archive, while the fourth chapter will solely use images submitted by the public that illustrate the experience of living in or around high-rise buildings.

The Times graphics team is producing the interactive elements with direction from Cizek and The Times‘ Jacqueline Myint. The New York Times will also open its collection of undigitized photographs for the project, including photographs that haven’t been seen in decades.

The multi-year, multimedia collaborative doc project Highrise explores the idea of vertical living in global suburbs. Since launching, the project has included mixed media, interactive docs, installations, films and live presentations.

Highrise recently won a Canadian Screen Award for best original non-fiction digital media program or series for One Millionth Tower. That’s in addition to its previous award wins, including a Gemini, Digital Emmy and IDFA DocLab Award.

Op-Docs is The New York Times‘ editorial department’s forum for short documentaries, produced by both renowned and emerging filmmakers in a range of styles, and covering current affairs, contemporary life and historical subjects

A Short History of the Highrise will premiere in the summer on NYTimes.com and subsequently on NFB.ca/highrise.

Submission guidelines for the project are available via The New York Times.

Image via NFB blog