Do adversarial relationships remain between traditional and new medias?

"Film and TV is not a place for innovative storytelling," stated Copperheart Entertainment founder and producer Steve Hoban, speaking on a convergence panel at Pinewood Toronto Studios on Friday.
Too Human

“Film and TV is not a place for innovative storytelling,” stated Copperheart Entertainment founder and producer Steve Hoban, speaking on a convergence panel at Pinewood Toronto Studios on Friday.

“What I think will help us is the interactive and gaming world with all the young, up and coming talent,” he added.

The panel on virtual production technologies in film, TV and gaming was part of the Previsualization and Virtual Production from the Screen Industries Research and Training Centre (Sirt), where Hoban was joined by Tony Walsh from gameco Phantom Compass, artistic director Lui Francisco from Bedlam Games, and moderated by journalist Jennie Punter.

Hoban’s words don’t come lightly and to illustrate this, he announced that he’s currently working with St. Catharine’s-based gameco Silicon Knights to bring its Too Human game IP (pictured) to the big screen.

Though still in very early stages of development, Hoban says Silicon Knights president and movie lover Denis Dyack had initially conceived the Too Human world of Norse mythology as a film.

“It has such great design and they spent $35 million on the game – we could even see that becoming a high-end TV series with great visuals.”

When considering working on different platforms, he stressed the importance of determining the motivation and gains of doing so, with the all-important question of determining “what is the point of developing on different platforms?”

Walsh from Phantom Compass added that “games are not the best solution all the time.”

“There’s long-lasting engagement, but games can still be alienating to some audiences,” he said, also noting that there are far too many adversarial conversations between traditional and new media folks.

“That’s all silly and we need to stop that,” he said. “We want more integration between interactive and film and TV.”

Bedlam’s Francisco has also had experience working on both sides, as his gameco is currently working with Vincenzo Natali on a film and game adaptation of William Gibson’s sci-fi novel Neuromancer.

“We’ve worked closely with film production companies and they’re very receptive to the game side of things.

“Unifying the two markets is challenging,” said Francisco. “There are interesting stories in games that could be interesting in movies, but they’re developed after the fact and tend to fall down on the fact that it wasn’t seen viably from the beginning.”